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It's Always Ohio

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theatre

The Holy Grail of Theatre: Sandusky Hosts Broadway Production, Spamalot

Full disclosure, musicals and theatre are not our forte. Did you notice how we spelled “theatre?” We heard that’s the proper way to do it.  All of that being said, some productions get us dancing and we love us some Spamalot. Adapted from the hysterical 1975 film, Monty Python and the Holy Grail, this parody of the Arthurian legend has left many a crowd in stitches. Lucky for the folks in and around Sandusky, they now have the chance to join the aforementioned galley of laughter.

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Credit: Sandusky State Theatre

If you’ve been following along with It’s Always Ohio, you’ll know that we’re quite fond of Sandusky, Ohio and it seems like the revival of this old town continues to flourish. A Broadway musical? That’s big. For those who haven’t seen this original film this musical is based off of, well, I blow my nose at you! Trust us, you’ll get it later. But seriously, it’s one hilarious movie and the Broadway musical version is just as funny.

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Sandusky State Theatre Facebook

Aside from the actual show, the Sandusky State Theatre is something to behold in its own right.  A striking and beautiful historic landmark, the State, as locals refer to it, has been around since 1928 and is currently on track to be completely renovated for it’s 100th anniversary in 2028.

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Sandusky State Theatre Facebook

If it was us, we’d go ahead a book tickets for the show on Wednesday, Nov. 21st, so that we could hit up Volstead Bar for a proper old fashioned before the show. Just a suggestion. From there you could visit a number of fantastic restaurants around the area for post-show supper. Shore House Tavern, OH Taco and Crush Wine Bar are a few of our favorites.  Make a little night of it! All jokes aside, this is definitely an experience you don’t want to miss. Snag up some tickets before they’re gone, we heard they’re going fast. See you in Sandusky!

21687456_1675296602503298_8996168711295964590_nTickets range from $35-$68 and are available for purchase through the Sandusky State Theatre website here. Spamalot is presented by the Firelands Regional Medical Center.

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Sing and Dance Your Way Through Summer with Wooster’s Ohio Light Opera

We’ve been on and on in previous posts about how awesome the town of Wooster, Ohio is — It has a European feel, relaxed vibe, phenomenal food, a great brewery, tons of wineries, fun outdoor space…truth be told, this list could go on forever.  It’s really that cool.  As evidenced by another piece we put together called “Wooster is the Coolest (And Tastiest) Town in Ohio You Haven’t Been To.”

Credit: Main Street Wooster Facebook

Okay okay, enough of how cool Wooster is, seriously though, it’s cool.  This post is all about another hidden gem that lays within this little town.  We’re talking about the Ohio Light Opera.

Credit: Ohio Light Opera Facebook

Located in the College of Wooster’s Freedlander Theatre and dubbed as America’s Premier Lyric Theater Festival, Ohio Light Opera’s season usually runs from around mid-June to mid-August, with this summer being no different.  The 2017 season fires up on June 17th with The Music Man and ends on August 12th.  Their knack for nabbing terrific actors and putting together terrific casts is evident, regardless of which show you end up seeing.  We had the pleasure of seeing a production of “Oh Kay!” back in 2015 and suffice to say, was more than okay.  Alright, that’s an awful pun, but it had to be done.

Ultimately though, you don’t have to be an avid fan of lyric theater to enjoy a production at the Ohio Light Opera and whether you’re part of a large family or not, it makes for something altogether different and fun.  That and you can cruise around in the town of Wooster afterwards, which I believe we’ve already mentioned, is quite awesome.

Quick foodie tip: Since our last Wooster post, two of our favorite restaurants have snagged some new digs in town and are definitely with the stop.  Muddy’s Cafe moved into an old Cadillac dealership on E. Liberty and now features a ton of live music on top of their already great food.  Spoon Market & Cafe now sits at 144 W. Liberty St. and has a brilliant amount of usable space which of course, they use undeniably well.

This upcoming 2017 season offers a really fun selection of classical favorites, newer/popular shows and a few rarer productions.  Below is an abridged list —  For full details you can visit www.ohiolightopera.org and www.mainstreetwooster.com.  You can also order tickets by calling (330)-263-2345.

The Music Man

(1957)

That a homespun show about the shenanigans of a music peddler in a small Midwest city beat out West Side Story for the 1958 Tony Award for Best Musical speaks volumes. Meredith Willson drew on memories of his childhood days in Iowa and fashioned the music, lyrics, and book for a seemingly timeless story that continues to capture the hearts of young and old.

Anything Goes 

(1934)

While at a New York bar, evangelist-turned-nightclub-singer Reno Sweeney has fallen for Billy Crocker, who, to be near his girlfriend Hope Harcourt, has stowed away on Reno’s transatlantic cruise ship. Forced to adopt various disguises to avoid detection, Billy eventually secures a ticket and passport from Reverend Moon, who has been branded Public Enemy No. 13. Not surprisingly … confusion ensues.

HMS Pinafore 

or The Lass That Loved a Sailor
(1878)

Gilbert and Sullivan’s rollicking romp through naval life, class distinctions, and melodramatic villainy has entertained millions since its London premiere. Where else can one find a First Lord of the Admiralty who had never seen a ship, or a seafaring captain who gets seasick, or a nursemaid who can’t tell one baby from another?  Josephine, the Captain’s daughter, is in love with able seaman Ralph Rackstraw. But her father has other plans for her: an advantageous union with the exalted Sir Joseph Porter, K.C.B. When the young couple’s elopement is thwarted by cantankerous seaman Dick Deadeye, it remains for Little Buttercup to confess that her baby farming techniques had left something to be desired … a many years ago.

Primrose

(1924)
If ever there were a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, this is it – the first fully-staged production in almost a century of George Gershwin’s 1924 musical Primrose. Written for the London stage (255 performances), but never brought to Broadway, the show reveals the composer fully crossing the threshold into the jazz-inspired stylings that would take Broadway by storm just a few months later in Lady, Be Good! The show centers on dapper Toby Mopham, who finds himself engaged to vulgar beautician Pinkie Peach. To help him out of the situation, he calls on his friend, houseboat-dwelling author Hilary Vane, who himself has fallen in love with ingenue Joan, who reminds him of the character Primrose in his latest story. After many (and we do mean many) complications, characters, and disguises, everyone winds up with his or her ideal mate.

The Student Prince 

(1924)

The Student Prince, the longest-running Broadway musical of the 1920s, is for many theater-goers the quintessential romantic operetta. Hungarian-born composer Sigmund Romberg cashed in on his earlier musical training in Vienna and created a magical score of waltzes and marches, all set to Dorothy Donnelly’s adaptation of a 1901 German play titled Old Heidelberg. Prince Karl-Franz, accompanied by his tutor Dr. Engel and pompous valet Lutz, arrives at Heidelberg University, but finds his studies less enticing than the waitress Kathie at the local inn. The age-old clash between love and duty rears its head when he is summoned back home to the deathbed of his grandfather and ordered to marry Princess Margaret.

Countess Maritza 

(1924)

Count Tassilo, now penniless, has taken a menial position as manager of one of the estates of the wealthy Maritza. He hopes to earn enough money to pay off his debts and provide a dowry for his sister Lisa. To ward off a constant barrage of suitors, Maritza announces a mock engagement to a fictitious pig farmer, a Baron Koloman Zsupan. To her surprise, a real Baron Zsupan shows up and claims her hand. Tassilo, also, has some covering up to do when Lisa appears as part of Maritza’s house party. As romantic feelings blossom between Tassilo and Maritza, so do their pride and stubbornness as employer and employee – Maritza has no choice but to fire her manager. But … she has a change of heart.

The Lady of the Slipper 

or A Modern Cinderella
(1912)

With stepsisters named Dollbabia and Freakette, a cat named Mouser, and two fellows named Punks and Spooks who emerge from a cornfield (a la Wizard of Oz) to entice Cinderella to the ball and then into the prince’s arms, “zany” is indeed the right term for a show that captured the public’s fancy and became the second-longest-running book musical of 1912.

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